#GivingTuesdayCA is here!

GivingTuesday-Wide

GivingTuesday is a National Giving Day

Most people know about Black Friday and Cyber Monday… now GivingTuesday is coming to Canada on December 1, 2015.

It is a new Canadian movement for giving and volunteering, taking place each year after Cyber Monday. The “Opening day of the giving season,” it is a day where charities, companies and individuals join together to share commitments, rally for favourite causes and think about others.

So, why should you donate to the Learning Disabilities Association of Windsor – Essex County?  Simple.  Your donation will have a direct impact on a child, youth, or adult here in Windsor – Essex.  See below to learn how you can help.

Help a child learn to read (1)

Help a youth graduate from high school (1)

Help someone find a job

You can help a child make a friend...

Make your donation to LDAWE go further on Giving Tuesday!

Several companies are offering donation matching programs for Giving Tuesday:

PayPal: Make a donation through CanadaHelps.org, using PayPal starting on Tuesday December 1, 2015 through Thursday December 31, 2015 and PayPal will match 1% of every donation made throughout the promotion.

Interac Online: On GivingTuesday, December 1st, 2015, Acxsys Corporation (the architects of the Interac network) will match online charitable donations made through CanadaHelps.org and paid using Interac Online, up to $25 per donation and a maximum total of $10,000 in matching dollars.

Text – to – Donate to LDAWE is Back!

Text LDAWE to 20222 to help children, youth, and adults with learning disabilities in the Windsor – Essex community. You can donate $5, $10, $20, or $25. You will have the option to download a charitable donation receipt. Text to donate will end on December 31, 2015.

Visit our website to learn more about our programs and services.

 

Youth Helping Youth

Guest Blog Post by: Bev Clarke, Executive Director of LDAWE

As LDAWE programs and services grow, youth involvement… and more importantly, the contribution of youth in our community continues to grow!

Haunted House FundraiserOn October 31, 2015, Adam Wong and DECA students from Sandwich Secondary School will be hosting Haunted House at 1245 Minto, in Lasalle. Months of planning, building, marketing, recruiting actors, and requesting donations goes into creating the Haunted House. This year, Tim Hortons will be providing free hot chocolate and Bull’s Eye Pizza will be donating pizza to be sold by the slice. All those entering the house are asked to give a donation. Proceeds from the event will benefit LDAWE’s Youth Recreation Program.

Recently, youth assisted in a number of ways to ensure the success of our recent Instruments of Change Conference and Gala. Youth sat on the planning committee and assisted with set up and clean up. Madeline Doornaert, a Walkerville Secondary School student, coordinated the musical entertainment and performed. Talented secondary school students (WCCA performers under the direction of Patti Hopper, the Micelli Twins, Lauren Elliott, Natalie Culmone, Georgia Rose) performed throughout the evening.

University of Windsor students enrolled in the Odette School of Business’ Management and Organizational Life Course are required to engage in a fundraising activity to benefit a local charity. LDAWE has been fortunate to receive donations from eight groups of students in the past couple of years.

This year, St. Clair College students in the Educational Support Program Club have selected LDAWE as the recipient of funds raised by the Club.

And last, but not least, the LDAWE has been fortunate to have the voice of a youth on the Board of Directors, as the Youth Consumer Representative. Rachel Baker and Donny Wilcox previously contributed to the Board, and currently, Lucas Lavoie represents youth at the Board table.

Youth Helping YouthLDAWE encourages youth involvement in a variety of ways, as program participants, volunteers, employees, secondary school co-op placements, and as Board members. LDAWE would like to thank all of the youth who have demonstrated a commitment to building a community partnerships that supports the work of the Association and ultimately assists in improving the availability of services for individuals with learning disabilities and ADHD in Windsor-Essex County.

Moving Towards Strength-Based Learning

Strength-Based LearningIt’s October.  For the Learning Disabilities Association of Windsor – Essex County (LDAWE) this means a busy month with lots of activities, because October is Learning Disabilities Awareness Month.  This year’s plans in Windsor – Essex have included:

A major focus of this year’s events have been a transition from focusing on the individual with learning disabilities’ weaknesses to focusing on their strengths.  During the Keynote at the Instruments of Change Conference, Dr. Cory Saunders referenced Dr. Ross Greene‘s “Kids Do Well When They Can” model.  Saunders asked the audience, “Why do we focus on the negative?  Does this help the child?”  Saunders left the audience with a to do list:

  1. Focus on successes
  2. Normalize development
  3. Foster growth in areas of strength

Another great resource for parents and educators is the HBO documentary, I Can’t Do This But I Can Do That: A Film for Families About Learning Differences as seen in the trailer below:

So what is strength-based learning?  Here at LDAWE, we believe that strength-based learning allows people to participate and excel in activities that match their strengths.  We began this process in our Summer Enrichment Camps by having weekly themes, which allow children to excel at drama, STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math), etc…  During our Open House, we will be taking this one step further by announcing plans for our new 3D Printer.

We encourage you to bring your entire family (recommended for ages 6+) with you to LDAWE’s Open House on October 24, 2015 from 9:00am – 12:00pm at 647 Ouellette Avenue in Windsor, Ontario.  The highlight of this free event will be the demonstration of our new 3D Printer; however, there will also be a child activity area, demonstrations of our assistive technology, and information about our programs, scholarship, etc… A short presentation will take place at 11:00am.  A few lucky attendees will even win one of the items made by the 3D Printer during the event.

Contact us at info@LDAWE.ca or 519-252-7889 for more details.

Why Participating in Research is Important

UWindsor Blog Post by: Carlin J. Miller, Ph.D

ResearchAs a researcher, I often have trouble understanding why parents of kids with ADHD would not participate in helping us better understand this disorder. I’m passionate about the process because I know the difference what scientists have uncovered in the past 20 years makes. And, I know how much is still unknown or unclear.

As a parent, I get it. You have limited time and you don’t want to spend the little free time you have filling out forms and traveling to the university. You aren’t sure it will benefit your child. Consider this post an opportunity to find out what is happening in ADHD research at the University of Windsor as well as a chance to better understand the process.

First, let’s deal with the time commitment. We, as scientists, understand being busy. Those of us who are parents experience the same time crunch you have and we don’t want to waste anyone’s time. We try to ensure that every question we ask is pertinent. We try to administer measures that help us better understand ADHD but we are also trying to be helpful to you. Just the same, gathering information takes time.

MindfulnessI can use my own recent project as an example. Our group offered an 8-week program in mindfulness-based meditation to parents and teachers of ADHD last spring. Before they started the program, we had participants fill out forms about their current psychological state and what they knew about ADHD. We also kept track every week of how they were doing at incorporating meditation into their daily lives. At the end, we had another round of questions about their emotions and their ADHD knowledge. Because it was a pilot project with a very small group, the statistical data isn’t very useful, but the information provided by participants helped them track their own progress. I was also making sure that each participant was not in enough distress to need encouragement to see their family doctor. At the end, participants said the program was very helpful and they would recommend it to others. They also reported feeling less stressed, less anxious, and more competent around their parenting. If you are interested in hearing more about this project or participating in the next 8-week program for parents and teachers later this fall, call me at the University (519-253-3000, ext. 2226) or send me an email (cjmiller@uwindsor.ca). We are also in the process of developing similar programming for school-age kids and adolescents to be offered in the late fall and early in the winter.

The mindfulness program is not the only research project on ADHD or related issues at the University of Windsor. One of my undergraduate students is surveying local parents and teachers of preschoolers about the relations among preschooler temperament, parenting style, and risky play. We hope to find that a child’s personality predicts risky play and that parenting style may make a difference in play outcomes. Another student is in the process of developing an online intervention to promote on-task behaviour in university students. A student in another faculty member’s research group will begin a project in the winter to examine handwriting performance in 10-12 year olds who have ADHD and are taking stimulant differences. (You can reach that student, Tom Duda, at dudat@uwindsor.ca.)

Without ongoing research, treatment for ADHD will stay where it is today. By volunteering your time and/or your child’s time as a research participant, you are helping us improve life for many, perhaps even you.

Carlin J. Miller, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Clinical Neuropsychology
Department of Psychology
University of Windsor
http://uwindsor.ca/cjmiller