A Time for Change… Student-Led Individual Education Plans

Guest Blog Post by: Bev Clarke, Executive Director of LDAWE

Self-AdvocacyHaving reviewed many Individual Education Plans (IEPs) that indicate the student should develop better self-advocacy skills, I am always curious to know how the student will learn to be an effective self-advocate.   Whose responsibility is it to explain the student’s learning disability; the legislation that outlines his/her rights; the services / supports / accommodations available; relevant language; and ultimately the policies and procedures to be followed, when engaging in self-advocacy? Is the psychologist that diagnoses, the parent, the teacher, the school administrator, or outside agency such as the Learning Disabilities Association responsible for teaching the student to be an effective self-advocate?

How do we measure whether the student is becoming a better self-advocate?  Is it when the student requests the accommodations and support outlined in the IEP that was prepared for student by an educator, in consultation with a parent?  Is it when the student is able to work independently in the classroom?  Is it when the student is able to get what they need in classroom without demonstrating or causing frustration? Or… is it when they are able to effectively contribute and direct their own IEP?  The Ontario Government’s Individual Education Plan (IEP) A Resource Guide (2004) indicates that principals are required to ensure that those students over 16 years of age must be consulted in the development of their IEP.  The Guide further indicates, “that any student for whom an IEP is being developed should be consulted to the degree possible.”  So, when and how does this begin?

I am the "I" in IEPI have had many conversations with parents, educators, other professionals, who suggest that the child may be too young to understand his/her learning disability; however, when speaking to very young children, they are clearly able to identify their strengths, and more specifically their differences, and while I wouldn’t expect a primary student to be able to say “I have central auditory processing disorder, which makes it difficult for me to prioritize noise in the classroom, so it would be very helpful to me to have access to an FM system,”  I would expect a primary student to be able to say, “I can’t pay attention when there is too much noise.”  They may not know all the educational and disability lingo and possible solutions to addressing their learning needs, but they recognize their differences very early.  Self-advocacy instruction and support should begin early.

The United Nations adopted the motto Nothing About Us, Without Us for International Day of Disabled Persons in 2004.  Observance of the Day was intended “to focus on the active involvement of persons with disabilities in the planning of strategies and policies that affect their lives.” The motto relies on the principle of participation and has been associated with the global movement for individuals with disabilities to achieve full participation and equalization.  I would argue that direct instruction and support is required for many students with learning disabilities to have full participation in the development of their IEPs and to develop the skills and acquire the knowledge to become effective self-advocates.

Student Led IEPThe IEP is arguably the most important document developed regarding the student with exceptionalities at school. The IEP meeting provides an opportunity to discuss critical issues and make decisions regarding specific accommodations and support services.  Creating the IEP without the student or with only token involvement teaches the student that his or voice is not important (Hawbaker, 2007); it is important for students with learning disabilities to not only be the receiver, but the author of their accommodations (McCarthy, 2007) and observing the student’s ability to meaningfully contribute to the IEP provides the school team with a way to measure the effectiveness of the self-advocacy instruction.  The goal is for students with learning disabilities to move from others leading their learning to students leading their own learning, with IEP meetings providing an opportunity to practice their decision making skills and gradually increasing autonomy to promote increased self-responsibility (Connor, 2012).

Students cannot be expected to know appropriate meeting protocol, systems, policies and procedures, and all the lingo the surrounds issues associated with education, disability, and legislation without instruction; however, they can be taught this information, with support and instruction from parents, educators, professionals, and local agencies. Developing effective self-advocacy skills as an elementary and secondary school student prepares the student to successfully advocate for themselves in a post-secondary environment, in the workplace, and in the community.

References:

Connor, D. (2012). Helping students with disabilities transition to college – 21 tips for students with LD and/or ADHD. Teaching Exceptional Children. 44, 5, 16-25.

Hawbaker, B. (2007) Student-led IEP meetings: Planning and implementation strategies – A case story. Teaching Exceptional Children Plus. 3, 5.

McCarthy, D. (2007). Teaching self-advocacy to students with disabilities. About Campus. 12, 5, 10-16. doi:10.1002/abc.225.

3 thoughts on “A Time for Change… Student-Led Individual Education Plans

  1. Great article. To those who say that “the child may be too young to understand his/her learning disability”, I would suggest that we have a responsibility to meet these kids at their level of understanding, and to build upon that.

  2. We are in the process of having our son go through the testing process. An independent psychologist has diagnosed him with Developmental Coordination Disorder (memory issues) and now we just met today with the school psychologist and team (speech therapist/motor skills) etc. Yet again, starting several rounds of testing to see if they agree with the other psychologist’s diagnosis and develop IEP.

    I’m glad I read this. Our son is in 5th grade (11) and I wonder if they will allow him to have a say in his Education plan? He has a difficult time expressing himself. Is that too young and would that be too over-whelming to him?

    Sandi

    • The Identification Placement Review Committee (IPRC) meetings can be intimidating for parents, so you can expect that your son may be a bit anxious in a very formal meeting situation. It is appropriate and necessary for children with learning disabilities to become confident in meetings that involve decisions about their learning. In some cases, students will be asked to join the meeting for the last 5-15 minutes to provide an overview of the meeting discussion and request feedback. The older the child is, the more involvement he/she should have in the meeting. It is very appropriate for a grade 5 student to be involved in meetings related to his learning. You should request that he be included in the meeting.

      The development of the Individual Education Plan is not typically completed by a group of professionals, a teacher or learning support teacher prepares the document. The Ministry of Education suggests parent and student consultation. It may be helpful for both you and your son to meet with the person preparing the document, as it will take some time for son to have a good understanding of the process, what accommodations and supports are available, and what his rights are as a person with disability. Initially he may not be able to lead the discussion, but he should be encouraged to state what he thinks will work for him in the classroom, when presented with recommendations.

      It is recommended that you contact your local Learning Disabilities Association to find out if they offer transition planning programs or provide advocacy support services.

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