Don’t DIS my ABILITY!

October is Learning Disabilities Awareness Month

The theme for this year’s Learning Disabilities Awareness Month is, “Don’t DIS my ABILITY!: Imagine the difference it could make if we focused on the strengths of people with learning disabilities instead of their weaknesses?”  Here’s some basic facts about learning disabilities (LDs):

  • It is generally accepted that 10% of the general population has LD
  • By definition, someone with LD has average to above average intelligence
  • LDs impact certain skills, most of which can be improved with the appropriate supports
  • When individuals with LD do not receive timely appropriate supports, they have a higher than average rate of school dropout, unemployment, and poverty

Don't Dis my Ability

Why a Person’s Abilities Matter

“People too often define the life of someone living with LDs by the areas where their LDs impact directly, such as math, reading, writing, or organizational skills.  The goal of this campaign is for people to see beyond that to their multiple areas of strength.  LDs didn’t stop Richard Branson, Jamie Oliver, or John Lennon.  A person with LDs just needs the right supports to achieve success.” – Lawrence Barns, President and CEO of LDAO

Our goal is to see that every person living with LD in Windsor-Essex County is given the support, opportunity, and understanding they need to succeed, by seeing their true ability!  Please help us accomplish our goal by:

  • donating to LDAWE,
  • following our social media feeds (see the links below),
  • encouraging your friends, family, and colleagues to follow our social media feeds,
  • sharing our various LD Awareness Month posts, tweets, and images on your own social media feeds, and
  • using the hashtags #LDMonth and #LD on your own posts, tweets, and images.

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One thought on “Don’t DIS my ABILITY!

  1. It’s all about making the invisible, visible. I think it’s great that we have a month dedicated to Learning Disabilities so we can educate and advocate. Too many people do not understand what a learning disability is and isn’t.

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